The linearized theory of elasticity

By: Slaughter, William SPublication details: Boston: Birkhäuser (Springer Science + Business Media, LLC), [c2002]Description: 543 pISBN: 9781461266082Subject(s): Mathematics | Mechanics, Applied | MaterialsLOC classification: QA931 .S584Online resources: View in Google books (partial access)
Contents:
Preface List of Figures List of Tables 1. Review of Mechanics of Materials 2. Mathematical Preliminaries 3. Kinematics 4. Forces and Stress 5. Constitutive Equations 6. Linearized Elasticity Problems 7. Two-Dimensional Problems 8. Torsion of Noncircular Cylinders 9. Three-Dimensional Problems 10. Variational Methods 11. Complex Variable Methods Appendix: General Curvilinear Coordinates References Index.
Summary: This book is derived from notes used in teaching a first-year graduate-level course in elasticity in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. This is a modern treatment of the linearized theory of elasticity, which is presented as a specialization of the general theory of continuum mechanics. It includes a comprehensive introduction to tensor analysis, a rigorous development of the governing field equations with an emphasis on recognizing the assumptions and approximations in­ herent in the linearized theory, specification of boundary conditions, and a survey of solution methods for important classes of problems. Two- and three-dimensional problems, torsion of noncircular cylinders, variational methods, and complex variable methods are covered. This book is intended as the text for a first-year graduate course in me­ chanical or civil engineering. Sufficient depth is provided such that the text can be used without a prerequisite course in continuum mechanics, and the material is presented in such a way as to prepare students for subsequent courses in nonlinear elasticity, inelasticity, and fracture mechanics. Alter­ natively, for a course that is preceded by a course in continuum mechanics, there is enough additional content for a full semester of linearized elasticity.---Summary provided by the publisher
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Item type Current library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book ICTS
Mathematics Rack No 8 QA931 .S584 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Checked out 08/12/2024 02835
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Preface List of Figures List of Tables
1. Review of Mechanics of Materials
2. Mathematical Preliminaries
3. Kinematics
4. Forces and Stress
5. Constitutive Equations
6. Linearized Elasticity Problems
7. Two-Dimensional Problems
8. Torsion of Noncircular Cylinders
9. Three-Dimensional Problems
10. Variational Methods
11. Complex Variable Methods Appendix: General Curvilinear Coordinates References Index.

This book is derived from notes used in teaching a first-year graduate-level course in elasticity in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. This is a modern treatment of the linearized theory of elasticity, which is presented as a specialization of the general theory of continuum mechanics. It includes a comprehensive introduction to tensor analysis, a rigorous development of the governing field equations with an emphasis on recognizing the assumptions and approximations in­ herent in the linearized theory, specification of boundary conditions, and a survey of solution methods for important classes of problems. Two- and three-dimensional problems, torsion of noncircular cylinders, variational methods, and complex variable methods are covered. This book is intended as the text for a first-year graduate course in me­ chanical or civil engineering. Sufficient depth is provided such that the text can be used without a prerequisite course in continuum mechanics, and the material is presented in such a way as to prepare students for subsequent courses in nonlinear elasticity, inelasticity, and fracture mechanics. Alter­ natively, for a course that is preceded by a course in continuum mechanics, there is enough additional content for a full semester of linearized elasticity.---Summary provided by the publisher

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